Logo

Printing training materials in Royal Tunbridge Wells

Print course materials that match the high quality of your training as and when you need them.

line drawing of people on training course
  • Send us a file
  • Quick quote

You don’t need to guess at how many training packs you’re going to need in a year any more for training courses in Tunbridge Wells.  Digital printers have made things so much easier for clients in Tunbridge Wells. Once we’ve got your training modules in our print management system, we can print what you need when you need it with a few clicks. (You can even do the clicking yourself if you’re signed up to our web-to-print service.)

Training materials made to measure for Tunbridge Wells clients

For a number of our training clients in Tunbridge Wells we offer personalised printing of training materials. We get an order for a specific combination of modules, print them, bind them and get them couriered to your students in Tunbridge  within 24 hours.

Everything for events in Royal Tunbridge Wells

Event printing can often be stressful if you’re dealing with last-minute programme changes  for events in Royal Tunbridge Wells. We handle the pressure and meet those tight deadlines. From programmes, booklet printing, pop-up banners and posters to tickets and event stands, leave it to us to get them to the Royal Tunbridge Wells venue on time.

Stretching your Royal Tunbridge Wells printing budget

Our printing and finishing machinery, print management systems and our print know-how can help you wring the most from your print budget in Royal Tunbridge Wells. A full-colour training manual might not be something you can stretch to, but throw in some clever collation technology and planning and voilà – a colourful, eye-catching booklet with all the cost savings of black-and-white printing. As a former Prontaprint franchise near Lewes, Zest brings many years of experience to deliver a personalised digital printing service second to none.

About Royal Tunbridge Wells

Royal Tunbridge Wells (often shortened to Tunbridge Wells) is a large affluent town in western Kent, England, about 40 miles (64 km) south-east of central London by road, 34.5 miles (55.5 km) by rail. The town is close to the border of the county of East Sussex. It is situated at the northern edge of the High Weald, the sandstone geology of which is exemplified by the rock formations at the Wellington Rocks and High Rocks.

The town came into being as a spa in the Restoration and had its heyday as a tourist resort under Beau Nash when the Pantiles and its chalybeate spring  attracted visitors who wished to take the waters. Though its popularity waned with the advent of sea bathing, the town remains popular and derives some 30 percent of its income from the tourist industry.

The town has a population of around 56,500 and is the administrative centre of Tunbridge Wells Borough and the UK parliamentary constituency of Tunbridge Wells. In the United Kingdom, Royal Tunbridge Wells has a reputation as being the archetypal conservative “Middle England” town, a stereotype that is typified by the fictional letter-writer “Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells”.

The economy of the town no longer depends on the chalybeate spring. Hardly anyone comes to the town purely to take the waters.

As of 2002 there were around 50,000 people employed in the borough of Tunbridge Wells. The largest sector of the local economy consists of hotels, restaurants, and retail (the centrally located Royal Victoria Place shopping centre, opened in 1992, covers 29,414 square metres (316,610 sq ft) ), which accounts for around 30% of all jobs; the finance and business sector makes up just under a quarter of jobs, as does the public administration, education and health sector. Royal Tunbridge Wells is arguably the most important retail centre between London and Hastings.

The largest single employer in the town used to be the Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, at the Kent and Sussex and Pembury Hospitals, employing around 2500 people; the largest single commercial employer was AXA PPP healthcare, employing around 1,700 in four offices (PPP House, Union House, Phillips House and International House). Tunbridge Wells enjoys a relatively low unemployment rate of around 1.0% as of August 2008, compared to a UK national rate of around 5.4%

Parks and landmarks

The Pantiles and its chalybeate spring have been the landmarks most readily associated with Royal Tunbridge Wells ever since the founding of the town, though the 5-metre-high (16 ft) steel Millennium Clock at the Fiveways area in the centre of town, designed by local sculptor Jon Mills for the Millennium celebrations, stakes a claim to be a modern landmark.

Tunbridge Wells contains green spaces that range from woodland to maintained grounds and parks. The most substantial areas of woodland are the Tunbridge Wells and Rusthall Commons, which comprise 250 acres (0.39 sq mi; 1.0 km2) of wood and heathland and are close to the centre of the town. Open areas of the common are popular picnic spots, and there is a maintained cricket ground situated next to Wellington Rocks.

Royal Tunbridge Wells has one local commercial radio station, KMFM West Kent. Many London stations can also be picked up in the town. The BBC has its regional centre in the town at the Great Hall Arcade. It is the base of BBC Radio Kent and for BBC South East regional programming, the complex containing studios, offices and a BBC shop.

Located in the town centre opposite the railway station, Calverley Grounds is a historic park with ornamental gardens and a bandstand (now demolished). The park was part of Mount Pleasant House—which was converted into a hotel in 1837—until 1920 when the Borough Council purchased it for the town. The bandstand dated from 1924 and was damaged by an incendiary bomb in 1940 and parts of the metalwork were sold for scrap metal. The subsequently repaired bandstand and the adjacent pavilion were intended to form part of a new centre to the park but were never completed. The bandstand was demolished in 2010 although the pavilion still exists as a café. Just inside the entrance to the park coming from the station is a memorial to Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding, hero of the Battle of Britain, who lived and died in Tunbridge Wells.

Dunorlan Park, at 78 acres (0.122 sq mi; 0.32 km2) the largest maintained green space in the town, was once a private garden that was part of the millionaire Henry Reed’s now demolished mansion, and only passed into public possession in 1941. The gardens were designed by the renowned Victorian gardener James Green, but over the years they became overgrown, making it hard to distinguish the full scope of Marnock’s design. In 1996 Tunbridge Wells Borough Council applied to the Heritage Lottery Fund for a grant to restore the park in line with the original designs, and in 2003/4 Dunorlan underwent a £2.8 million restoration. The River Teise rises in the park, and two dams on it have created a pond and a boating lake. Dunorlan is listed as Grade II on English Heritage’s National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

Great Culverden Park is a small, 9½ acre woodland in the Mt. Ephraim area behind the site of the old Kent and Sussex Hospital and is the remnant grounds of the previous Great Culverden House designed by Decimus Burton that used to stand on Mt. Ephraim.

The oldest public park in Royal Tunbridge Wells is Grosvenor Recreation Ground designed by landscape architect Robert Marnock, located close to the town centre on Quarry Road. It was opened in 1889 by Mayor John Stone-Wigg, on the land that was formerly Caverley Waterworks. The lake area with dripping wells remains, but the other lakes, bandstand and open air pool have all gone. There is a bowls club, café, toilets and children’s play area, including cycle track. It is adjoined by the Hilbert recreation ground, parts of which have been designated as a local nature reserve by the Kent High Weald Partnership; these include Roundabout Woods and the adjoining grass areas. The Hilbert Recreation Ground was donated to the town by Cllr Edward Strange in 1931, on the site of the form John Beane’s Charity Farm. There are two football pitches, built as part of the King George V playing fields scheme, and a skatepark.

The Salomons Museum preserves the home of Sir David Salomons, the first Jew to serve as Lord Mayor of London and the first non-Christian to sit in Parliament. It preserves the bench from which Salomons rose to speak as the first Jewish MP ever to speak in Parliament.

 

Let us simplify your printing today...

Send us your enquiry & we'll call you right back!

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.