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Printing training materials in Lewes

Print course materials that match the high quality of your training as and when you need them in Lewes

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You don’t need to guess at how many training packs you’re going to need in a year any more for training courses in Lewes.  Digital printers have made things so much easier for clients in Lewes. Once we’ve got your training modules in our print management system, we can print what you need when you need it with a few clicks. (You can even do the clicking yourself if you’re signed up to our web-to-print service).

Training materials made to measure for Lewes clients

For a number of our training clients in Lewes we offer personalised printing of training materials. We get an order for a specific combination of modules, print them, bind them and get them couriered to your students in Lewes within 24 hours.

Everything for events in Lewes

Event printing can often be stressful if you’re dealing with last-minute programme changes for events in Lewes. We handle the pressure and meet those tight deadlines. From programmes, booklet printing, pop-up banners and posters to tickets and event stands, leave it to us to get them to the Lewes venue on time.

Stretching your Lewes printing budget

Our printing and finishing machinery, print management systems and our print know-how can help you wring the most from your print budget in Lewes. A full-colour training manual might not be something you can stretch to, but throw in some clever collation technology and planning and voilà – a colourful, eye-catching booklet with all the cost savings of black-and-white printing. As a former Prontaprint franchise near Lewes, Zest brings many years of experience to deliver a personalised digital printing service second to none.


Something about Lewes

Lewes is the county town of the administrative county of East Sussex, in England, and historically of all of Sussex. It is a civil parish and is the centre of the Lewes local government district. The settlement has a history as a bridging point and as a market town, and today as a communications hub and tourist-orientated town. The town was the site of the Battle of Lewes in 1264. The town has landmarks including Lewes Castle and a 15th century bookshop. At the 2001 census it had a population of 15,988, increasing to 17,297 at the 2011 Census.

The Lewes Chamber of Commerce represents the traders and businesses of the town. The town has been identified as unusually diversified with numerous specialist, independent retailers, counter to national trends toward ‘chain’ retailers and large corporate retail outlets.

Lewes Farmers’ Market, one of the first in the UK, was started in the 1990s by Common Cause Co-operative Ltd and is a popular re-invention of Lewes as a market town. The Farmers’ Market takes place in pedestrianised Cliffe High Street on the first and third Saturdays of every month, with local food producers coming to sell their wares under covered market stalls. A weekly food market in the Lewes Market Tower was established in July 2010 by Transition Town Lewes to allow traders to sell local produce. Occasionally French traders from the Twin Town of Blois attend, vending on Cliffe Bridge.

In September 2008, Lewes launched its own currency, the Lewes Pound, in an effort to increase trade within the town. One Lewes Pound is equal to £1. Like the similar local currency in Totnes, the initiative is part of the Transition Towns movement. The Lewes Pound and the Transition Towns movement have received criticism for a failure to address the needs of the wider Lewes population, especially lower socio-economic groups. Such local currency initiatives have been more widely criticized in light of limited success stimulating new spending in local economies and as an unrealistic strategy to reduce carbon emissions. The Lewes Pound can be exchanged for the same amount of pounds sterling in several shops in Lewes and can be spent in a wide range of local businesses. Many of the notes were sold on eBay at a higher amount. Early numbers and sequenced notes fetched very high prices from foreign collectors.

Transport

Lewes, from its inception, has been an important transport hub. Its site as a bridging point was probably originally a ford: today the main routes avoid the town centre. The A27 trunk road taking traffic along the south coast between Eastbourne and Southampton passes to the south of the town. The A26 from Maidstone to Newhaven; and the A275 (the London road) both come in from the north. The Brighton & Hove Bus and Coach Company serve the town. The Bus Station was closed for a while but reopened in late 2008.

Lewes railway station was originally the junction for six routes. The town still enjoys hourly fast trains from London. The two erstwhile rural rail routes to the north, linking to East Grinstead and Uckfield respectively, are both now closed, but the East Coastway Line, connecting Brighton with Eastbourne and Hastings, and the branch to Seaford remain.

 

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