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Printing training materials in Hastings

Print course materials that match the high quality of your training as and when you need them.

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You don’t need to guess at how many training packs you’re going to need in a year any more for training courses in Hastings.  Digital printers have made things so much easier for clients in Hastings. Once we’ve got your training modules in ourprint management system, we can print what you need when you need it with a few clicks. (You can even do the clicking yourself if you’re signed up to our web-to-print service.)

Training materials made to measure for Hastings clients

For a number of our training clients in Hastings we offer personalised printing of training materials. We get an order for a specific combination of modules, print them, bind them and get them couriered to your students in Hastings within 24 hours.

Everything for events in Hastings

Event printing can often be stressful if you’re dealing with last-minute programme changes  for events in Hastings. We handle the pressure and meet those tight deadlines. From programmes, booklet printing, pop-up banners and posters to tickets and event stands, leave it to us to get them to the Hastings venue on time.

Stretching your Hastings printing budget

Our printing and finishing machinery, print management systems and our print know-how can help you wring the most from your print budget in Hastings. A full-colour training manual might not be something you can stretch to, but throw in some clever collation technology and planning and voilà – a colourful, eye-catching booklet with all the cost savings of black-and-white printing. As a former Prontaprint franchise near Lewes, Zest brings many years of experience to deliver a personalised digital printing service second to none.


About Hastings

Hastings is a historic town and borough in the county of East Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, on the south coast of England. The town is located 24 mi (39 km) east of the county town of Lewes and 53 mi (85 km) south east of London, and has an estimated population of 90,254,[2] which makes it the 66th largest settlement in the United Kingdom.[3]

Historically, Hastings can claim fame from the Battle of Hastings, and later because it became one of the medieval Cinque Ports. Hastings was, for centuries, an important fishing port; although nowadays less important, it still has the largest beach-based fishing fleet in Europe. The town became a popular spot for ‘taking the waters’ (therapeutic bathing in the sea) in the 1760s, and then, with the coming of the railway, a seaside resort.

Hastings main shopping centre is Priory Meadow Shopping Centre, which was built on the site of the old Central Recreation Ground which played host to some Sussex CCC first-class fixtures, and cricketing royalty such as Dr. W. G. Grace and Sir Don Bradman. The centre houses 56 stores and covers around 420,000 ft². Further retail areas in the town centre include Queens Road, Wellington Place and Robertson Street.

Hastings main shopping centre is Priory Meadow Shopping Centre, which was built on the site of the old Central Recreation Ground which played host to some Sussex CCC first-class fixtures, and cricketing royalty such as Dr. W. G. Grace and Sir Don Bradman. The centre houses 56 stores and covers around 420,000 ft². Further retail areas in the town centre include Queens Road, Wellington Place and Robertson Street.

There are plans to expand the retail area in Hastings, which includes expanding Priory Meadow and creating more retail space as part of the Priory Quarter development. Priory was intended to have a second floor added to part of the retail area, which has not happened yet and so far only office space has been created as part of the Priory Quarter.

Regeneration

In 2002 the Hastings and Bexhill task force, set up by the South East England Development Agency, was founded to regenerate the local economy, a 10-year programme being set up to tackle the local reliance on public sector employment. The regeneration scheme saw the construction of the University Centre Hastings, (now known as the University of Brighton in Hastings) the new Sussex Coast College campus and construction of the Priory Quarter, which still remains unfinished but now houses Saga offices, bringing 800 new jobs to the area.

There are many parks and open spaces located throughout the town, one of the most popular and largest being Alexandra Park opened in 1882 by the Prince and Princess of Wales. The park contains gardens, open spaces, woods, a bandstand, tennis courts and a cafe. Other open spaces include White Rock Gardens, West Marina Gardens, St Leonards Gardens, Gensing Gardens, Markwick Gardens, Summerfields Woods, Linton Gardens, Hollington woods, Filsham Valley, Warrior Square, Castle Hill, St Helens Woods and Hastings Country Park.

Hastings has 18 primary schools, four secondary schools, one further education college and one higher education institution.

The University of Brighton in Hastings offers higher education courses in a range of subjects and currently attracts over 800 students. The university’s Hastings campus doubled in size in 2012, with the addition of the new Priory Square building designed by Proctor and Matthews Architects. This is located in the town centre a short distance from the railway station.

Sussex Coast College, formerly called Hastings College, is the town’s further education college; it is located at Station Plaza, next to the railway station.

The secondary schools in the town include Ark Helenswood Academy, Ark William Parker Academy, Hastings Academy and The St Leonards Academy. East Sussex County Council closed three mixed comprehensive schools: Filsham Valley, The Grove and Hillcrest, replacing them with two academy schools, The St Leonards Academy, and The Hastings Academy. The sponsors for the academies are University of Brighton (lead sponsor), British Telecom and East Sussex County Council itself. East Sussex County Council provisionally approved the closure of Hillcrest, The Grove and Filsham Valley. The academies were opened in September 2011.

Religious buildings

The most important buildings from the late medieval period are the two churches in the Old Town, St Clement’s (probably built after 1377) and All Saints (early 15th century). There is also a mosque, formerly “Mercatoria School” until purchased by the East Sussex Islamic Association. The former Ebenezer Particular Baptist Chapel in the Old Town dates from 1817 and is listed at Grade II.

 

 

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