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Printing training materials in Gatwick

Print course materials that match the high quality of your training as and when you need them.

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You don’t need to guess at how many training packs you’re going to need in a year any more for training courses in Gatwick.  Digital printers have made things so much easier for clients in Gatwick. Once we’ve got your training modules in our print management system, we can print what you need when you need it with a few clicks. (You can even do the clicking yourself if you’re signed up to our web-to-print service.)

Training materials made to measure for Gatwick clients

For a number of our training clients in Gatwick we offer personalised printing of training materials. We get an order for a specific combination of modules, print them, bind them and get them couriered to your students in Gatwick within 24 hours.

Everything for events in Gatwick

Event printing can often be stressful if you’re dealing with last-minute programme changes  for events in Gatwick. We handle the pressure and meet those tight deadlines. From programmes, booklet printing, pop-up banners and posters to tickets and event stands, leave it to us to get them to the Gatwick venue on time.

Stretching your Gatwick printing budget

Our printing and finishing machinery, print management systems and our print know-how can help you wring the most from your print budget in Gatwick. A full-colour training manual might not be something you can stretch to, but throw in some clever collation technology and planning and voilà – a colourful, eye-catching booklet with all the cost savings of black-and-white printing. As a former Prontaprint franchise near Lewes, Zest brings many years of experience to deliver a personalised digital printing service second to none.


About Gatwick

Gatwick Airport (also known as London Gatwick) is a major international airport in south-east England, 29.5 miles (47.5 km) south of Central London and 2.7 nautical miles (5.0 km; 3.1 mi) north of Crawley. It is the second-busiest airport by total passenger traffic in the United Kingdom, after London Heathrow. Gatwick is the ninth-busiest airport in Europe.

Gatwick opened as an aerodrome in the late 1920s, and has been in use for commercial flights since 1933. The airport has two terminals, the North Terminal and the South Terminal, which cover areas of 98,000 m2(1,050,000 sq ft) and 160,000 m2 (1,700,000 sq ft) respectively. It operates as a single-runway airport, using a main runway with a length of 3,316 m (10,879 ft). A secondary runway is available but, due to its proximity to the main runway, can only be used if that is out of use. In 2016, 43.1 million passengers passed through the airport, a 7.1% increase compared with 2015.

On 17 September 2008, BAA announced it would sell Gatwick after the Competition Commission published a report about BAA’s market dominance in London and the South East. On 21 October 2009 it was announced that an agreement had been reached to sell Gatwick to a consortium led by Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP), who also have a controlling interest in Edinburgh airport, for £1.51 billion. The sale was completed on 3 December. In February 2010, GIP sold minority stakes in the airport of 12% and 15% to the South Korean National Pension Service and the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA) for £100 million and £125 million, respectively. The sales were part of GIP’s strategy to syndicate the equity portion of the original acquisition by issuing bonds to refinance bank debt. Although this entails bringing additional investors into the airport, GIP aims to retain management control. The Californian state pension fund CalPERS acquired a 12.7% stake in Gatwick Airport for about $155 million (£104.8 million) in June 2010.On 21 December 2010, the A$69 billion (£44 billion) Future Fund, a sovereign wealth fund established by the Australian government in 2006, agreed to purchase a 17.2% stake in Gatwick Airport from GIP for £145 million. This transaction completed GIP’s syndication process for the airport, reducing its stake to 42% (although the firm’s extra voting rights mean it still controls the airport’s board).

The airport has two terminals, South and North. Both have shops and restaurants landside and airside, and all areas are accessible to disabled passengers. There are facilities for baby changing and feeding, and play areas and video games for children; business travellers have specialised lounges. The North and South Terminals are connected by a 0.75 miles (1.21 km), elevated, two-way automated people mover landside. They are not connected once past security.

South Terminal

South Terminal international arrivals concourse

The official opening of the central and main pier of what is now the South Terminal, with 11 aircraft stands, was on 9 June 1958. Gatwick was one of the world’s first airports with an enclosed pier-based terminal, which allowed passengers to walk under cover to waiting areas near the aircraft (with only a short walk outdoors). Another feature of Gatwick’s new air terminal was its modular design, permitting subsequent, phased expansion.

As passenger numbers grew, a circular satellite pier was added to the terminal building. It was connected to the main terminal by the UK’s first automated people mover system. (This replaced the original North pier dating from 1962; and the people mover was subsequently replaced with a walkway and travelators).

North Terminal

Gatwick’s North Terminal building and transit station

Construction began on the North Terminal on land previously earmarked for a second runway in the draft plan of May 1970. This was the largest construction project south of London in the 1980s, costing £200 million. In 1991 a second aircraft pier was added to the North Terminal.

On 16 May 2005 the new Pier 6 opened at a cost of £110 million, adding 11 pier-served aircraft stands. The pier is linked to the North Terminal’s main building by the largest air passenger bridge in the world, spanning a taxiway and providing passengers with views of the airport and taxiing aircraft.

Gatwick’s original terminal, the Beehive, is included within the City Place Gatwick office complex together with 1, 2 and 3 City Place. The complex was developed by BAA Lynton. A number of airlines have had offices at the Beehive, including BEA/British Airways Helicopters, Jersey Airlines, Caledonian Airways, Virgin Atlantic and GB Airways. Other airlines which had headquarters on airport property (including office buildings on the site of, or adjacent to, the original 1930s airport) include British Caledonian, British United Airways, CityFlyer Express, Laker Airways and Tradewinds Airways.

Gatwick Aviation Museum

Situated to the North-West of the airfield near the village of Charlwood, there is a Museum including original items and photographs from Gatwick’s history, as well as a variety of military aircraft. It is open Friday, Saturday and Sunday all year round.

 

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