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Printing training materials in Croydon

Print course materials that match the high quality of your training as and when you need them.

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You don’t need to guess at how many training packs you’re going to need in a year any more for training courses in Croydon.  Digital printers have made things so much easier for clients in Croydon. Once we’ve got your training modules in our print management system, we can print what you need when you need it with a few clicks. (You can even do the clicking yourself if you’re signed up to our web-to-print service.)

Training materials made to measure for Croydon clients

For a number of our training clients in Croydon we offer personalised printing of training materials. We get an order for a specific combination of modules, print them, bind them and get them couriered to your students in Croydon within 24 hours.

Everything for events in Croydon

Event printing can often be stressful if you’re dealing with last-minute programme changes  for events in Croydon. We handle the pressure and meet those tight deadlines. From programmes, booklet printing, pop-up banners and posters to tickets and event stands, leave it to us to get them to the Croydon venue on time.

Stretching your Croydon printing budget

Our printing and finishing machinery, print management systems and our print know-how can help you wring the most from your print budget in Croydon. A full-colour training manual might not be something you can stretch to, but throw in some clever collation technology and planning and voilà – a colourful, eye-catching booklet with all the cost savings of black-and-white printing. As a former Prontaprint franchise near Lewes, Zest brings many years of experience to deliver a personalised digital printing service second to none.


About Croydon

Croydon is a large town in south London, England, the principal settlement of the London Borough of Croydon. It is located 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross. It is one of the largest commercial districts outside of Central London, bearing one of the largest shopping districts and a developed night-time economy. It is identified in the London Plan as one of 11 metropolitan centres in Greater London. It has a population of 52,104 in the 2011 census, comprising the Addiscombe, Broad Green and Fairfield wards.

Historically a part of the hundred of Wallington in the county of Surrey, at the time of the Norman conquest of England, Croydon had a church, a mill, and around 365 inhabitants, as recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. Croydon expanded during the Middle Ages as a market town and a centre for charcoal production, leather tanning and brewing. The Surrey Iron Railway from Croydon to Wandsworth opened in 1803 and was the world’s first public railway. Later nineteenth century railway building facilitated Croydon’s growth as a commuter town for London (including the City of London). By the early 20th century, Croydon was an important industrial area, known for car manufacture, metal working and its airport. In the mid 20th century these sectors were replaced by retailing and the service economy, brought about by massive redevelopment which saw the rise of office blocks and the Whitgift Centre, for many decades the largest shopping centre in London until 2008. Croydon was amalgamated into Greater London in 1965, but is still considered by some to be part of Surrey because of the postal county.

Croydon lies on a transport corridor between central London and the south coast of England, to the north of two gaps in the North Downs, one followed by the A23 Brighton Road through Purley and Merstham and the main railway line and the other by the A22 from Purley to the M25 Godstone interchange. Road traffic is diverted away from a largely pedestrianised town centre, mostly consisting of the North End. Its main railway station, East Croydon, is a major hub of the national railway transport system, with frequent fast services to central London among other destinations such as Brighton. The town is unique in Greater London for its Tramlink light rail transport system.

Croydon has a diverse economy with the service and retail sectors now dominating over the town’s historical market status. It is today served well by its extensive rail network centering on East and West Croydon stations, from where London Overground, First Capital Connect and Southern operate to most parts of Greater London, Surrey, Sussex, Hampshire and the East of England. With the A23, M23 and M25 orbital motorway intersecting Croydon to the South East, it is the principal gateway of the motorway network from the East Sussex area of the South Coast. London Gatwick Airport is located to the direct south of the town and has scheduled flights to destinations within Europe, North America and Asia, although has tough competition from the even bigger London Heathrow Airport to the west but has managed to stay the UK’s second busiest airport. The town has since 2000 had a tram network which has been highly successful, carrying more than 24 million passengers a year. The network has four lines with destinations including New Addington to Wimbledon, Beckenham to West Croydon, Elmers End to Therapia Lane, and Elmers End to West Croydon. Croydon is one of only five London boroughs not to have any form of London Underground services.

These good transport links have been a major factor contributing to the growth of Croydon, and have led to the town becoming a major centre for distribution. Retail is another major service and employer in the town centre, with a retail economy which has experienced a boom resulting in several new shops. North End is Croydon’s main shopping street, with the Whitgift and Allders situated on it. The town centre also includes the famous Surrey Street market, one of the only lasting town centre markets in the Croydon and South London areas, and over 3 indoor shopping centres. The Whitgift Centre and the newest Centrale centre. Park Place will re-establish Croydon as one of the UK’s top shopping areas. Plans include the construction of a new shopping centre to replace St George’s Walk and older properties on George Street. The proposed redevelopment of Park Place by Minerva and Lend Lease will create a one million square foot destination with over 130 shops, cafes and restaurants, anchored by a new department store which the council hopes will be John Lewis. Other tenants interested have included Habitat, Borders and Gap. Improvements will see Queen’s Gardens completely remodelled, together with the construction of a fully integrated public transport hub to include a new bus interchange and tram stop. The building of Park Place will create Europe’s largest covered retail area

 

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